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What are you Grilling? What's Cooking

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  #31  
Old 02-21-2019, 02:59 AM
JBT JBT is online now
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Originally Posted by GaryProtein View Post
The problem with induction is you cannot get high heat temperatures. With either gas or electric you can get cast iron pants to 750 degrees F easily for searing measured with an IR thermometer but tops out at 450-475 for induction, at least on one of my friend's induction stoves.
Thermador induction puts a great sear on steaks. I don't know what temp it gets to, but the sear is second to none.
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  #32  
Old 02-21-2019, 03:22 AM
Mille162 Mille162 is offline
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Induction has even heat which means you don't have to move pots and pans back and forth while cooking.


Agreed, but you donít move the pan back and forth for heat so much as you are moving the food in it. High heat and sauteing veggies, tossing a risotto, tipping to collect juices and spooning/basting, rolling an omelette...there are countless scenarios where you want to move the pan around and thatís my point on evaluating what type of cook you are and then picking the equipment which matches up best to your style/skill level. If you do one pan cooking, basic searing, sauteing by moving a spatula around and boiling water for pasta, an induction is fine. If you have 4 pans on the stove at one time and a pot in the oven, a quick shake/rock/toss of the pan is essential to multi-tasking and finishing/plating at the same time. Cooking for multiple people or just multiple/complex dishes requires a cooktop surface that doesnít need to be babied.

Again, Iím not saying induction is bad or gas is better, just that each type is better for different types of cooks, and the OP should instead be evaluating his specific cooking style and usage for making his decision. I can cook a great complex menu on an induction stove, just like I can prep a 6 course meal with a paring knife or make fresh ravioli using a wine bottle for a rolling pin if I had no other option, but I wouldnít prefer to do that from the beginning, Iíd plan to have the best and most efficient tool for the job I knew was coming up.
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  #33  
Old 02-21-2019, 01:49 PM
seahug seahug is offline
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Yup yup.

Tossing is a very fast way to flip food in a pan and get even cooking - for ex: sauteing anything (vegetables, shrimp), fried rice - much faster than using a spatula. Swirling and tossing is also a fast way to make pasta + pasta water thicken a sauce and if you want exactly al dente you don't want it sitting in the pan longer than needed.

This is much harder to do on induction. You can lift the pan much higher to avoid banging the pan but the heat stops right away and then you have to very gently put it back down. The other thing is on a semipro gas range, the grates are designed so you can slide pots and pans around the whole cook top. You don't have to lift the pots and you can use the space in between the burners.

But, Mille is right. Just depends on how important this is to you. Induction cooktop is perfectly usable. Our induction cooktop gets hotter than the typical 15k-17k btu burners on a semi pro gas cooktop so yes searing works well.
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  #34  
Old 02-21-2019, 05:06 PM
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Why Induction Cooking is the Hottest Trend to Hit Restaurant Kitchens


https://www.foodserviceandhospitalit...rant-kitchens/
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  #35  
Old 02-22-2019, 09:06 AM
Mille162 Mille162 is offline
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Originally Posted by seahug View Post
Yup yup.

Tossing is a very fast way to flip food in a pan and get even cooking - for ex: sauteing anything (vegetables, shrimp), fried rice - much faster than using a spatula. Swirling and tossing is also a fast way to make pasta + pasta water thicken a sauce and if you want exactly al dente you don't want it sitting in the pan longer than needed.

This is much harder to do on induction. You can lift the pan much higher to avoid banging the pan but the heat stops right away and then you have to very gently put it back down. The other thing is on a semipro gas range, the grates are designed so you can slide pots and pans around the whole cook top. You don't have to lift the pots and you can use the space in between the burners.


To saute literally means ďto jumpĒ and itís called that because the food jumps around on its own in the pan over med- high heat as itís moisture escapes and reacts with the small amount of fat in the pan.

youíre food isnít jumping around on its own?
A: Youíre searing it (med-high heat, food doesnt move)
B: youíre steaming it (not enough heat in pan for the fat/moisture to react or too much moisture in the pan, usually cause you out in too much food at once).

Try and correct the steaming issue and turn the heat up and now youíre stir-frying (high-heat and food is moved manually by the chef as moisture escapes too fast)

Want to just add more oil to the pan to keep temp of pan up and offset the extra moisture; now youíre pan-frying (enough oil to cover the bottom of the pan but not enough to submerge the food).

Sauteing is an issue with induction because as the food jumps around, little bits of the fat and what not splatter out and run down the side of the pan...this would be a sizzle and amazing aroma on a gas range as thatís burned off, but on any flattop surface it runs down the pan edge till it reaches the bottom
of the pan, where it burns. After a few minutes you start to build up a nasty residue on the bottom edges of your pan. Now cleaning up is a PITA because all that gunk has to be scrubbed off so your pan will lay perfectly flat.

If youíre not getting some of that oil splattering out, youíre not sauteing. Most likely your heat is too low and the moisture is laying in the pan and steaming your food (and youíre not able to brown it), or you donít have enough fat on the fan to react with the escaping moisture of your food to make it jump around, which means youíre searing it and not cooking it all the way through.

As that article stated, there are many advantages in a commercial kitchen...but keep in mind too that in a commercial kitchen the chef has a stack of pans to keep grabbing a clean one as his gets dirty...and why does he have so many clean pans? Cause theres a guy there sweating in the dishroom whoise only job is to scrub every pan clean and return it back to the line.

Induction: great for clean cooks
Gas: better for messy cooks
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